Trends

Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: March 13, 2013

Digital Public Library of America

Besides transitioning to the Twitter account @dpla, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) announced it will provide copies of 1.2 million digital objects to the DPLA. If you’re interested in learning more about the non-profit, there’s a brief Q&A with the new DPLA Executive Director, Dan Cohen. The launch will take place April 18-19, 2013 at the Boston Public Library.

California Bill Demands Credit for Online Courses (MOOCs)

As reported in the New York Times and Inside Higher Ed, a new bill to be filed by California Senate President Darrell Steinberg “aims to create a ‘statewide system of faculty-approved, online college courses.'” [1] Read More »Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: March 13, 2013

Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 20, 2013

Oxford Blocks Google Docs

This week, the University of Oxford took the extreme action of blocking access to Google Docs, due to security concerns. The block lasted two and a half hours because “the impact on legitimate business was greater than anticipated, in part owing to the tight integration of Google Docs into other Google services.” Subsequently, Oxford University Computing Services apologized to their users.
Read More »Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 20, 2013

Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 13, 2013

Edwin Mellen Press Lawsuit

This week Inside Higher Ed broke the story on Edwin Mellen Press suing a librarian and McMaster University over a blog post. Is this an attack on academic freedom? What questions does it raise for librarians expressing their opinions as professionals? It’s been a developing story all week and one we’ll be sure to follow on Eduhacker.
Read More »Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 13, 2013

Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 6th, 2013

Bill of Rights for Online Learners

Stakeholders in educational technology drafted a Bill of Rights for online learners, which then drew criticism from other stakeholders as published in the Chronicle of Higher Ed. That criticism prompted a thoughtful rebuttal from Cathy Davidson. As MOOC companies become more entwined with higher education, expect greater calls for transparency and unease regarding student data and revenue streams.

Coursera’s MOOC Meltdown

Speaking of MOOC’s, ironically, Coursera’s class “Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application” was cancelled due to difficulties with design and technology. A student from the class blogged about feeling cheated because of the course’s failure. It raises questions about the relationship between students and MOOC’s. What is the commitment from an institution to non-paying students? Are MOOC’s all just a grand experiment? What does it mean to be cheated out of something that is free? For those of you interested in teaching a MOOC, read Tucker Balch’s post “Teaching a MOOC: Lessons Learned & Best Balch Practices.”
Read More »Weekly Ed-Tech / Digital Scholarship Trends: February 6th, 2013