Posts Categorized: Books

Five Favorite Picture Books

Reading: it builds empathy and increases language development. Beyond those two benefits, it’s also a wonderful form of entertainment. We value reading in our household and we read to our daughter on a daily basis. Though, I usually write about books that I’m reading; I thought I’d mention a few current favorites and get some recommendations in return.

 

Roar!

 

tiger-roars

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown

Premise: A tiger in a Victorian-era city is tired of the stuffy life he and his fellow animals lead.He wants to be himself. He wants to go wild. What happens when social conventions slip?

Artwork: Simple and reminiscent to early video games. There’s an 8-bit quality that’s really wonderful.

Reasons to love: Good message and kids like to roar along with Mr. Tiger.

 

More Tigers

 

Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue and Pamela Zagarenski

Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue and Pamela Zagarenski

Premise: A little girl doesn’t want to go to bed. She and her parents talk about how different animals sleep.

Artwork: Gorgeous. I’d love to frame a print and hang above S–’s bed.

Reasons to love: Guides kids through the bedtime process. Teaches kids about animals. Doesn’t force the issue of sleep.

 

Bunnies vs Parents

 

bunnies

The Bunnies Are Not in Their Beds by Marisabina Russo

Premise: Three little bunnies keep getting up in the night and interrupt Mom and Dad with their noise.

Artwork: Adequate.

Reasons to love: There’s an escalating pattern of bunnies not being asleep. Phrases like, “Looks like the bunnies are not in their beds” and “Goodnight, goodnight, sleep tight,” are popular hooks.

 

Get Up and Move

 

From Head to Toe by Eric Carle

From Head to Toe by Eric Carle

Premise: Examples of how different animals move.

Artwork: It’s Eric Carl, so if you like his artwork, it’s good. I’m sure I’m in the minority, but I don’t really like his art. Maybe, it’s slowly growing on me.

Reasons to love: Gets your kids up and moving and learning about animals.

 

Mystery

 

Snatchabook by Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty

Snatchabook by Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty

Premise: A little beastie called a Snatchabook is stealing everyone’s books. Eliza Brown solves the mystery.

Artwork: Warm, detailed, and gorgeous.

Reasons to love: Teaches a love of reading and compassion to others.

 

These are a few of our current favorites. What books should we check out from our library?

Review: The Boatmaker

In John Benditt‘s, The Boatmaker, I experienced a push-pull effect as the novel brought me in, then pushed me to the point where I almost quit reading it before it pulled me back completely. I enjoyed the novel; even more so for its ability to win me back as a reader.

Moby Dick. Ugh.

I started reading Moby Dick in June and began renovating our house in July. Sadly, I finished Moby Dick first. For some people, I’m sure me disliking Moby Dick is similar to a person giving the Grand Canyon a one-star review on Yelp.

The first 200-400 pages were funny and enjoyable. The 3000 page Wikipedia article on whaling put me to sleep, much like the characters in Bone. The final 50 pages are worth reading, but could still be condensed.

And so, I have defeated Moby Dick and am still alive to tell the tale. I can’t wait to read something else. Suggestions?

mobydickbone

On page 86 of An Unnecessary Woman. It’s so deliberate. Slow. A long conversation sitting in someone’s apartment. A love letter to literature. A remembrance of what a life in books costs.

Books As Technology: IKEA vs Monks

IKEA created a clever ad comparing their catalog, the bookbook, (book technology) to that of a tablet / e-book. While this advertisement is funny, it’s even funnier when juxtaposed with this video of a medieval “help desk” as users make the shift from scrolls to books. What is this technology you call the book?

 

A reply on Twitter brought this video to my attention this morning.

Summer Reading 2014

In no apparent order, here are some books I’m planning to read this summer. Please comment below if you have some suggestions.

The Flamethrowers
The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner (read)


Silence Once Begun by Jesse Ball

Scorch Atlas by Blake Butler

The Swan Gondola by Timothy Schaffert


The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (read)


Galatea 2.2 by Richard Powers (read)


Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan


Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks


Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion


Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov


A Mercy by Toni Morrison